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kubectl Usage Conventions

Using kubectl in Reusable Scripts

For a stable output in a script:

Best Practices

kubectl run

For kubectl run to satisfy infrastructure as code:

Generators

You can generate the following resources in kubectl runusing --generator flag:

If you do not specify a generator flag, other flags prompt you to use a specific generator. The following table lists the flags that force you to use specific generators, depending on the version of the cluster:

Generated Resource Cluster v1.4 and later Cluster v1.3 Cluster v1.2 Cluster v1.1 and earlier
Pod --restart=Never --restart=Never --generator=run-pod/v1 --restart=OnFailure OR --restart=Never
Replication Controller --generator=run/v1 --generator=run/v1 --generator=run/v1 --restart=Always
Deployment --restart=Always --restart=Always --restart=Always N/A
Job --restart=OnFailure --restart=OnFailure --restart=OnFailure OR --restart=Never N/A
Cron Job --schedule=<cron> N/A N/A N/A

Note: These flags use a default generator only when you have not specified any flag. This means that when you combine --generator with other flags the generator that you specified later does not change. For example, in a cluster v1.4, if you initially specify --restart=Always, a Deployment is created; if you later specify --restart=Always and --generator=run/v1, a Replication Controller is created. This enables you to pin to a specific behavior with the generator, even when the default generator is changed later.

The flags set the generator in the following order: first the schedule flag then restart policy and finally the generator.

To check the final resource that was created, use --dry-run flag, which provides the object to be submitted to the cluster.

kubectl apply